Story By John Murray

   Facebook messages, e-mails, phone calls and personal conversations have all been saying the same thing - the City of Waterbury is about to buy the Republican-American building on Meadow Street and convert it back into the transportation hub of Waterbury.

   The first tip to the Observer came six weeks ago, and came from a journalist who had a credible source with extensive experience in economic development in greater Waterbury. The word was it was a "done deal."

A autumn view of Waterbury from the South End of the city. Photo by John Murray

Waterbury Mayor Neil O'Leary steamrolled his way into a second term in office by winning a resounding 68% of the vote in a three-way contest. O'Leary was delighted with the results, and said it's a clear message from the voters of Waterbury to keep pushing his agenda forward.  Republican Jason Van Stone came in second with 19% of the vote, and Larry De Pillo of the Independent Party took third with 13%.

                                        Photographs By John Murray

   Industrial Riggers of Waterbury removed the cross at Holy Land this morning to make way for a new and bigger cross that Giuseppe Pisani of Pisani Steel hopes to have installed before Christmas. That's a steeple of St Anne's Church on the right.

   While his job title, "supervisor of school turnaround" is a bit clunky, Paul A. Whyte is bringing an impeccable education and some remarkable experience to his new post in Waterbury, Connecticut.

   Whyte, 41, holds a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from Yale University and a Masters of Education in Administration, Planning, and Social Policy (APSP) from Harvard Graduate School of Education. He is currently working on a Ph.D from Columbia University in NYC.

A brilliant sunset, and the silhouette of the Republican-American clock tower in downtown Waterbury, Connecticut. Photograph by John Murray

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